I have vowed to myself to make my blog an honest and open place for me to talk about real subjects and open my heart to the world. So telling the truth—Ghostwriting books wasn’t my life’s goal. The course of my life leading me to be a ghostwriter has been arduous, however—filled without a single regret.  I love what I do, but understandably, most people don’t wake up one day and say, “I’m going to be a ghostwriter.”

And neither did I.

I grew up believing I would be a professional musician. My youth was consumed with dreams of playing guitar on stage. I wanted to be in front of thousands with cheers and screams—all for me. I practiced relentlessly, day and night, to hone my craft of playing guitar. It was all I could think about. I strongly believed in myself and yes, I desperately dreamed of being a rockstar. I wanted nothing more than to stand in front of thousands, make millions of dollars, sell millions of albums—all from playing my guitar. I was convinced this was going to happen, and I never had a shred of doubt it wouldn’t.

And yes—I accomplished this dream.

But, it wasn’t exactly the dream I had envisioned.

I made it out on the road and played around the United States. The band I was in toured the East Coast for years, living out of suitcases, eating bologna sandwiches and sleeping wherever we could lay our heads—all in the belief and pursuit of the music. We loved what we were doing and decided intently, after many years of slogging it out in smoke-drenched bars, along with the many objections from everyone, to try our fair in the biggest music city in the world—Los Angeles California.

Much like the Clampett’ s™, we loaded up the truck (or cars in our case), and we drove three thousand miles across the country to land in Hollywood, California. On Sunset Strip, we put it all on the line, and there, we bonded as a family, and chased our dreams practicing six days a week, 8-10 hours a day. We embraced everything about Sunset Strip and what it had to offer—record companies, notoriety, glitz, flyers, people, marketing, madness, and most of all the music—all in the name of headlining in front of record companies in some of the most famous clubs, stages, and destinations in the world.

The biggest lesson I learned from it all was that I was in a matchless situation that happens—once in a lifetime. It was extremely rare to find five people, all with different beliefs, circumstances, and families could come together in one accord to share one mindset and give up everything to follow one solitary dream…to be rock stars.

Each of us had our own vision of making it big, and we knew this was our opportunity to make something of the band, and most of all—make something out of our lives. We believed in something—the band, the music—and ourselves.

The band and music became more significant than we were and it all had a huge purpose.

My life as a ghostwriter is far from the glitz and lights of Hollywood, but I wouldn’t change a single thing. I love being a ghostwriter being behind the scenes and making others dreams come true. Now I practice and work on my skills daily 8-12 hours every day. And when I’m not writing, I’m reading — all with one thing in my heart—believing in myself so I can help others.

As a new author, your book isn’t any different, and this is where you come into the picture.

Not believing in the strength of a project is something I find almost every day. I speak to a lot of potential authors, and one of the main topics of discussion is the unsureness they can write a book or have something interesting enough for people to read.

From my experience over the years, I have gleaned one fact.

To do anything worthwhile—you must believe in yourself.

As a new author, to get off on the right foot, you must believe in yourself and your book. You must stand firm in your story, tell the truth, and your book will come to life. Worrying whether your life’s story is good enough—is wasted energy.

Everyone has experienced a life that no one else shares. Your memories are a treasure trove of material to talk about in your book. Between your skills, memories, and what you do well, I promise you will discover yourself and find that you have something to say. What you have to say is essential and should never be dismissed or tossed to the side as invaluable.

A book project takes time and perseverance along with the tenacity to see it through. Even if you have all these essentials in place…belief in your book project must never wane and is the essential ingredient in making it work. Although, I know how self-doubt can creep in and make things difficult. It’s human and natural to feel as if you have nothing valuable to say.

The good news is…

We all have something to say. The key is to figure out precisely what you want to say and depict a specific message to keep you on track with your book.

To be a good writer, you must believe wholeheartedly in your life story—and have faith. Faith by definition is believing in something you cannot see, feel, or taste. Your book is there but you cannot see it or feel it yet. It must be written and writing your book is a journey where you have to believe you are creating something that will stand the tests of time. And you must step up and don’t be afraid to offend and tell your story the way you see it.

Believe in what you say and how you say it. Your book will be a one-of-a-kind work that only you could have created.

It will be your immense belief in your book that makes your book stand out from the crowd. It will be you who digs deep within yourself and finds those special memories that make up the book of your dreams.

If you would like to discuss writing your book, get in touch with me today at ghostwriterusa1@gmail.com or schedule a free book meeting at http://meetme.so/ghostwritingusa and let’s talk about your new book and get it going.

 

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